Stories By Maureen Dowd

  • WASHINGTON — We got a rare glimpse of the tortured soul of George W. Bush this past week. During a speech at his presidential library in Dallas, Bush made the mother of all Freudian slips. He denounced “the decision of one man to launch a...
  • Alito’s draft opinion on Roe has brought to the fore how radical the majority on the court is.
  • WASHINGTON — During her Supreme Court confirmation hearings, Amy Coney Barrett tried to reassure Democrats who were leery of her role as a “handmaid” in a Christian group called “People of Praise.” The group has a male-dominated hierarchy and a...
  • WASHINGTON — I was watching Vogue’s live feed as Kim Kardashian tried to walk the red carpet at the Met Gala in her skintight, flesh-tone dress, gallantly helped up the stairs by Pete Davidson. I flashed back to Marilyn Monroe on another May...
  • Dowd: Still feeling the Bern If Republicans win in November, as seems likely, Democratic ambitions will shrink, but Bernie Sanders’ imprint on the party is going to be long-lasting.
  • WASHINGTON — Ari Rabin-Havt could not stop smiling in the winter of 2020. When a reporter asked the deputy campaign manager for Bernie Sanders why he was so happy, he replied, “Simple. I work for a 78-year-old Jewish socialist, who had a heart...
  • WASHINGTON — Please, Kim Kardashian, don’t elope with Pete Davidson. We’re already distracted by the wonder of Ketanji Brown Jackson and the blunder of Will Smith, the arrival of dreamy spring days and the return of dreaded mask rules. If we...
  • WASHINGTON — So, the slap. Why do people at the top of their careers snap and make wildly self-destructive moves that rip apart everything they have been working to build? In a blink, Will Smith went from Mr. Nice Guy on the verge of winning...
  • Dowd: Republicans badger Ketanji Brown Jackson, ignore... Now that we know Justice Clarence Thomas’s wife was plotting the overthrow of the government, he should get off or be thrown off.
  • A snarling pack of white male Republicans ripping apart a poised, brainy Black woman at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, using sordid innuendoes and baseless claims about race and porn to smear her as her pained family sat behind her. It...
  • WASHINGTON — Myron Cohen, a garment district silk salesman turned popular comedian in the Ed Sullivan era, loved to tell this chestnut: Picture a skinny little guy, a shrimp, a nothing. He walks into a lumber camp looking for a job. The...
  • Shakespeare knew character is revealed when the stakes are high. Volodymyr Zelenskyy has taken up arms against “a sea of troubles.”
  • Washington For actors, it is the most gripping, feared line ever written. “It is the Mona Lisa of literature,” said Simon Godwin, the director of the Shakespeare Theater Company here. “It is something we’re so deeply familiar with, it is hard...
  • Dowd: Zelenskyy and Trump: Two performers, one hero Donald Trump and Volodymyr Zelenskyy both played leaders on TV shows and then became leaders in real life. But only one is a hero.
  • WASHINGTON — History is full of strange odysseys and intersections. But it’s bizarre that two men who were both front page news in the Friday Times started on similar paths and, with a consequential encounter along the way, ended up so...
  • Dowd: Can Dems dodge doomsday? Exhausted, confused, isolated and depressed Americans are not buying the Democratic line that things are better than they look.
  • It may be a TikTok world, but sometimes old hacks know best. James Carville helped Bill Clinton get elected against stiff odds. David Axelrod helped Barack Obama get elected against stiff odds. And Stan Greenberg was the first to identify the...
  • I was in an Uber on Broadway in New York City when suddenly the world began violently shaking. A van had rammed the Uber. I was stunned, but I was also determined not to miss this semester’s first day of in-person classes at Columbia...
  • The murder of 22-year-old New York City police officer Jason Rivera reminds us we should be proud of good cops even as we root out bad ones.
  • WASHINGTON — André Leon Talley was not the easiest of friends. He could be demanding. And cutting. And moody. But he was the most glorious of friends. He was soigne, to use one of his favorite words, and he had éclat, to use another. He was a...